Molding

2013

Vital Technologies for Business Success in a Changing Global Market
January 21-23
Sheraton New Orleans (reserve a room online)
New Orleans, Louisiana

view photos from Molding conferences



CONFERENCE SESSIONS

MONDAY, January 21, 2013

Session 1: Reducing Costs & Green Manufacturing

Session 2: Adding Value

Session 3: Growing Your Business

TUESDAY, January 24, 2013

Session 4: Medical Molding

Session 5: Emerging Technologies

WEDNESDAY, January 25, 2013

Session 5: Emerging Technologies (cont.)

CONFERENCE AGENDA

Click on a lecture title to view the abstract.

Sunday, January 20, 2013

7:30pm: Evening Welcome Reception




Monday, January 21, 2013

8:00am Continental Breakfast

Session 1: Reducing Costs & Green Manufacturing

8:30am

APPLYING SUSTAINABLE MANUFACTURING PRINCIPLES AT A PLASTIC INJECTION MOLDING COMPANY Ed Cathey, Controller, Nypro
9:00am DRIVING TO GREEN Thomas Duffey, President, Plastic Components, Inc.
9:30am WE ARE GREEN BECAUSE IT SAVES MONEY, PERIOD! Per Flem, Recto Molded Products Inc.
10:00am Coffee Break
10:30am LEAN AUTOMATION - FINDING VALUE, CUTTING WASTE & PERFECTING PROCESS WITH SIMPLE ROBOTICS Bill Egert, Engr'g V.P., Logic One Robots
11:00am REDUCING PROJECT COSTS USING ADVANCED MOULD MANAGEMENT TECHNOLOGY Philip Parmenter, Managing Director, AST Technology GmbH (Germany)
11:30am MOLDERS USING WEB BASED IT SYSTEMS TO IMPROVE PRODUCTIVITY David Preusse, President, Wittmann Battenfeld Inc.
12:00pm ALUMINUM TOOLING FOR INJECTION MOLDING Dan Mishek, Owner, VistaTek
12:30-2:30pm Lunch Break (on your own)

APPLYING SUSTAINABLE MANUFACTURING PRINCIPLES AT A PLASTIC INJECTION MOLDING COMPANY

Ed Cathey, Controller, Nypro

The presentation will describe Nypro's efforts to become 'green' molding company, and in particular, discuss a Case Study of Sustainability at Nypro Mebane Molding Plant in North Carolina.

Keys to a Sustainability Program/Initiative:

  • Involve all levels of your organization (executives down to machine operators)
  • An interested/motivated leader at the local level (volunteer)
  • A local interested/motivated team/council (volunteers) 6 - 12 members (meet monthly)
  • Additional benefits of having a division and/or full time corporate level leader
  • Financial/Moral support from top management of company
  • Willingness to take the time to investigate available government incentives
  • Encourage and support education/training in GREEN concepts.

DRIVING TO GREEN

Thomas Duffey, President, Plastic Components, Inc.

The program is a "user-friendly", employee driven Continuous Improvement/ Lean Initiative project, designed to assess and review all activity in the organization, with an eye toward improving the productivity, emotional investment, and satisfaction for every employee in the company, including me.

Punchline: We have experienced sales growth of 84% from Q1 2009 to Q1 2012; with the incremental addition of 1 employee.

WE ARE GREEN BECAUSE IT SAVES MONEY, PERIOD!

Per Flem, Recto Molded Products Inc.

My presentation is based upon our own journey in cutting our electric costs in half, over an 8 year period. We had a rich environment with 45 old presses (scrapped all but 11), an old leaky cooling tower, and 160HP of air cooled chillers to "help" the leaky old cooling tower. We also cut our natural gas costs by 80% within one year at a cost of $500 to save $18,000/year.

Every molding facility has it's own circumstances depending upon number/size/technology of molding machines, the kind of components being manufactured and the facility being used.

For that reason everyone looks at energy consumption differently. The common denominator is that no one has produced a molding machine that doesn't use electricity, and that we all believe electric rates will only go up.

LEAN AUTOMATION - FINDING VALUE, CUTTING WASTE & PERFECTING PROCESS WITH SIMPLE ROBOTICS

Bill Egert, Engr'g V.P., Logic One Robots

With continuing economic difficulties, plastics molders are looking at Lean Automation to improve their molding process. Lean manufacturers excel at identifying process value important to their customers, cutting process waste and improving process efficiency.

Lean manufacturing involves a few aspects that may be new to injection molders: 1) your customer's values define process perfection; 2) process perfection maximizes customer satisfaction; and 3) Jidoka (built-in quality) is obtained via continuous flow, open systems & industry standards.

With the current economic trends, plastics molders are looking for cost-effective ways to deploy robots. Smart plastic molders use simple robot designs, via simple PLC controls. The result is automation that follows the lead of your workers, rather than stressing them with overly complicated problems. Besides more customer focus, smoother operations and better efficiency, lean molding provides cost savings from a practical approach to automation.

REDUCING PROJECT COSTS USING ADVANCED MOULD MANAGEMENT TECHNOLOGY

Philip Parmenter, Managing Director, AST Technology GmbH (Germany)

An injection mould tool entails a significant investment for a company both from a financial standpoint and the reliance on it to support plastic product manufacture. It is an integral part of the supply chain and there are several key stakeholders involved over the life of the mould tool, the major ones being:

  • The OEM, who wants the product produced by the tool
  • The moulder, who needs to use the tool to produce the product
  • The tool maker, who designs and manufactures the tool

Each one of these stakeholders has a different interest in the tool itself. Each one is looking for slightly different things, but in the end a common goal must be met: to efficiently produce quality parts on time while also keeping costs to a minimum.

This presentation will discuss new and advancing technologies that impact each stakeholder's relationship with the mould as well as the performance and profitability of the tool itself. These technologies involve greater visibility, by all stakeholders, of tooling activity regardless of where the tool is in the world. It involves unprecedented mould tool management, from setting and meeting production goals to proactive maintenance initiatives to critical documentation and analysis that, together, drive cost reduction and optimize production outcomes throughout the life of the mould tool.

ALUMINUM TOOLING FOR INJECTION MOLDING

Dan Mishek, Owner, VistaTek

Aluminum tooling has gained traction in the injection molding world. It is not just used for "prototype tooling" anymore. Below show advantages, successes and new industry standards for the use of aluminum tooling for plastic injection molding.

Benefits of Aluminum Tooling

  • Highlighting speed to make molds.
  • Faster to CNC machine.
  • Transfer heat better.
  • 4 to 10 times to polish a mold.
  • Faster cycle times to lower unit costs.
  • How many shots can you get?

Molders Using Web Based IT Systems to Improve Productivity

David Preusse, President, Wittmann Battenfeld Inc.

Web-Services technology is being realized today by many molding companies to enhance their molding operations performance, create uptime, obtain supplier support in shorter time for very low cost.

Consider a typical technician's ("Joe") equipment issue in most molding plants:

Joe tries to troubleshoot and fix the molding cell #32 problem issue by himself. Pre-recession of 2007, Joe used to have 50% more maintenance staff as he has today. He used to put one of his subordinates on a production cell problem, but now he must fix it, but he has a list of other priorities, including a mold change on press 46 that is hot. Later afternoon, Joe finally can call his equipment vendor for some guidance on the cell #32 issue. He gets some ideas to try and runs out to the cell and tries them. He then calls the vendor back and has a second exchange of ideas and heads back to the cell. During this process, Joe is multi-tasking 2 other shop floor tasks (crisis), so this process takes four hours and spills over into Thursday am. On the third call to his vendor, he asks how soon could he get a Service Tech dispatched to his plant for help. The vendor says as it's Thursday, perhaps Monday early afternoon they could have someone in Joe's plant. (Translation: Cell #32 is down for ~5 days until the vendor service tech can get there, resolve the issue, and Joe can have the cell running well again. This story has a few variations, like the vendor's technician learning the cell requires parts to work through the issue. This means more delays. This extends the Service call and costs.

Now lets try the same start, with a different Web Based Technology some Molders use today:

Joe tries the first couple calls and asks his vendor to use the web based tech connection tool. The vendor reviews the machine immediately and as if their technician was on Joe's plant floor. The web connection tool allows them to see Joe's Cell 32's machine program, error logs, command log, the system reports and to scope the machine remotely. A new part is determined prudent to test and the vendor overnights the part. Joe puts the part in the machine and has success to bring the cell back on line before the weekend. Joe's Company did not have to pay for a Service Tech's travel, hourly labor rate, and they did not have to loose the few days of down time. Joe's Company continued to capture the billable injection molding machine time for parts produced from the cell with more uptime.

While the vendor was in the machine with on line web inspection and without their own technician in Joe's plant, they also were able to see how Joe could modify the process and actually take another 1.5 seconds off the cycle time, and effectively increasing the cell output by 16%. The web based service to injection molding equipment and plant systems has been proven to decrease delays and service costs while it has also proven to be very secure to Plant's treasured security and intellectual property.

Web based service is being used today individually or collectively in these equipment components of a molding plant:

  • Injection Molding Machines
  • Central Water Systems
  • Central Material Handling Systems
  • Robots & Automation Cells

From interconnectivity between these items and smaller auxiliaries as temperature controllers, dryers, loaders, blenders, granulators, hot runner controls, and more will continue to give advanced molders a greater chance to compete, here in the USA.

Web Based Remote Monitoring can offer additional features and advantages available in today's innovations as:

  • Using smart phone and tablet APPs, the users can obtain email alerts from a down cell. For example, if after 55minutes a down cell, over a weekend, is not set back into full automatic cycle, an email goes out to the on site on weekend shift Plant Manager and a copy to the weekday Manufacturing Director.
  • A molder can see the monitoring conditions remotely of a plant system or a particular cell from anywhere. And its safe and secure for only approved customers employees, experts, to resolve or improve systems.
  • Molding Process or Maintenance Experts can help out a plant colleague and look at the equipment issue, without driving into the plant. VNC viewing lets a user see what is on the equipment screens, programs, error messaging and this provides more uptime.
  • When a vendor does realize the issue may actually be their own issue (not the Customer's), they may actually want to get their other colleagues looking at the issue in real time, quickly. And when the manufacturer's product software group sees the field issue first hand, they can react, create a change, send it over the web, and test it in far shorter time and costs then what we used to experience.
  • One plant can monitor or help a sister plant in a remote location.
  • A web cam may be placed on the molding cell to see its operation or to share some aspect required by others, both internal or with an outside trusted supplier.
  • Using an iPad App, one user can modify a dozen robots password security levels without climbing up on all his robots.
  • Another user decided to make small parameter changes to his mezzanine dryers without having to climb up there on a hot summer's day. He could see an error on one hopper loading on his iPhone while he was traveling away from his plant.
  • Molders have used these web based support to enhance their training, because as the supplier traced the issue to an electrical panel, the supplier drilled down to the press electrical schematics, and circled on the Customer's press monitor, where to look for the jumper.
  • Another molder used the diagnostics help from his vendor and then while still on line sent the replacement parts order to his vendor. All at the machine, in real time, in minutes.

The future holds great promise that these web based systems will continue to develop so that predictive monitoring of plant systems and equipment may further reduce downtime and increase plants throughput. We looked on line at their equipment to run diagnostics, solve problems, optimize their molding cell performance.

For connection, Web based system today can use Ethernet Cat 5 hard cable hook up or WiFi enabled networking or a pc (still requiring internet access) to hook their equipment to their supplier for tech support. So we will see a transformation in our industry to use more web based innovations as a competitive edge. And far advanced over the old fashion phone calls back and forth with days of delay and then a service tech (with travel costs and time delays) where a web connection will be in a couple of minutes.


Session 2: Adding Value

2:30pm

WHAT IS THE BEST APPROACH TO PRODUCE A MULTI COMPONENT PART? Juergen Giesow PhD, Regional Manager, ARBURG Inc.
3:00pm TOTAL INTEGRATED MANUFACTURING (TIM) Michael Schmidt, zahoransky-group.
3:30pm LOW FRONT CONTROL (FFC) - AN INNOVATION FOR IMPROVING PROCESS RELIABILITY AND PART QUALITY Kevin Beers, Sumitomo SHI Demag.
4:00pm TWO-SHOT, THERMOPLASTIC AND SILICONE OVERMOLDING OR SILICONE OVER SILICONE IN THE SAME MACHINE Juergen Giesow PhD, Regional Manager, ARBURG Inc.
4:30pm Coffee Break

WHAT IS THE BEST APPROACH TO PRODUCE A MULTI COMPONENT PART?

Juergen Giesow PhD, Regional Manager, ARBURG Inc.

Technical review of a two-component part produced efficiently with the different methods available. In a two shot machine, with two machines and a robot in between or mold the one shot in bulk and then overmold at a later time. All of the options will be discussed and reviewed with pros and cons to see what solution is the best for a given company.

TWO-SHOT, THERMOPLASTIC AND SILICONE OVERMOLDING OR SILICONE OVER SILICONE IN THE SAME MACHINE

Juergen Giesow PhD, Regional Manager, ARBURG Inc.

Review of the different technique to produce a 2 shot part that has Silicone as one or even for both materials. What needs to be considered on the machine, what needs to be considered in the tooling. Ways of transfering the first shot to the overmolding process.

Integrated solution for Vacuum, mold Valve gate will be reviewed as well as the heat control and the reason why they are so important.

TOTAL INTEGRATED MANUFACTURING (TIM)

Michael Schmidt, zahoransky-group

1 cube rotating 90 degrees back and forth; includes 2 A and 2 B ejector sides for producing either one or two components per side

2 hot sides (A and B) for producing either one or two components per side

2 Assembly automation units (i.e. Servo Pick and Place Mechanisms) for assembling A and B side components as well as A1 and A2 components if applicable

TIM Sequence of Operation for 4-Cavity 3 Part Assembly:

  • Mold Closes and A side is shoots 2 x 4 cavities
  • Mold opens and Cube rotates 90 degrees and closes again
  • Both A and B sides shoot plastic; concurrently Automation unit #1 picks 2 x 4 components from Cube ejector side A and holds until next cycle
  • Mold opens and Cube rotates 90 degrees back to home position and closes again
  • Both A and B sides shoot plastic again; concurrently automation unit #1 assembles 2 x 4 A side components to B side components and then removes assembly from ejector side B and places onto conveyor; Concurrently automation unit #2 picks 2 x 4 A side components from cube ejector side A and holds until next cycle
  • Repeat Cycle

Benefits of TIM:

  • Automated assembly of up to 3 single-component parts or 2 dual-component parts
  • Improved assembly by matching Cavity 1 to Cavity 1, Cavity 2 to Cavity 2….and so on
  • Only one cube providing smaller footprint than traditional in-mold assembly systems
  • Less expensive than traditional in-mold assembly systems
  • Platform mold with interchangeable inserts and modular hot-runner system providing:
  • Gate point flexibility for producing different parts geometries
  • Lower investment for second set of inserts by up to 50%
  • Quick change from one product to the next without taking mold off machine
  • New insert sets are tested and optimized at Zahoransky on their own test frames
  • Flexible automation systems providing:
  • Autoamtic assembly of up to 3 components
  • Down stream processing such as vision or leak test inspection
  • Extremely efficient assembly process up to 97%
  • Max output solution for high-volume requirements of multi-component personal care articles such as shaver handles and toothbrush handles
  • Turn-key solutions by Zahoransky providing complete control of mold and automation

Applications for TIM:

  • Packaging
  • Medical Devices
  • Personal Care Products

FLOW FRONT CONTROL (FFC) - AN INNOVATION FOR IMPROVING PROCESS RELIABILITY AND PART QUALITY

Kevin Beers, Sumitomo SHI Demag

The primary function and use of FFC is to balance the pressure ratios in a cavity or between cavities to optimize processes and achieve corresponding improvements in quality. It is a robust yet simple option which, up until now, had to be run at critical levels using complex adjustments. An explanation will be given as to how the process works in conjunction with the Zero Molding features on the Sumitomo machines. Examples will also be given that show real world applications and the subsequent improvements after using FFC.


Session 3: Growing your Business

5:00pm

GROWING YOUR BUSINESS: DEVELOPING PROPRIETARY PRODUCTS Max Leone, VP Business Development, Currier Plastics
5:30pm CONSIDERATIONS FOR YOUR MARKET DIVERSIFICATION STRATEGY Ted Morgan, Plante Moran
6:00pm Cheese & Wine Reception


Tuesday, January 22, 2013

8:00am Continental Breakfast


8:30am

EFFECTIVELY COMPETING WITH CHINA BY DEVELOPING A NICHE MOLDING BUSINESS Lynn Momrow-Zielinski, Extreme Molding
9:00am HIRING: OUTSMARTING THE CIRCUMSTANCES Kevin Dailey, Director of Human Resources, Mack Molding Co.
Session 4: Medical Molding

9:30am

MEDICAL DEVICE APPROVAL PROCESS Linda Braddon, Secure Biomed Evaluation
10:00am INJECTION MOLD VALIDATION OF THERMOPLASTICS AND LIQUID SILICONE IN A MEDICAL INDUSTRY-A PROJECT PLAN APPROACH Anand Agrawal, Supervisor Process Engineering, Carefusion
10:30am Coffee Break
11:00am THE MINIATURIZATION OF MOLDED MEDICAL DEVICES Phil Kinson, Medical Business Manager, Husky
11:30am QUICKLY TURNING ENGINEERING CONCEPTS INTO HIGH QUALITY MEDICAL ASSEMBLIES AND PRODUCTS Terrance M. Gleason, Business Development Executive for Medical Device, Spectrum Plastics Group
12:00pm NEW ADVANCEMENTS IN APPLYING HOT RUNNER TECHNOLOGIES EFFECTIVELY TO CHALLENGING MEDICAL MOLDING APPLICATIONS Paul Boettger, Technoject Machinery Corp
12:30pm POLYMER-BASED MICROFLUIDICS CHIPS: THE ENGINE THAT DRIVES A NEW CLASS OF MEDICAL DEVICES - PROGNOSTIC DEVICES Rey Parel, Managing Director, Parel Engineering LLC
1:00-2:30pm Lunch Break (on your own)

GROWING YOUR BUSINESS: DEVELOPING PROPRIETARY PRODUCTS

Max Leone, VP Business Development, Currier Plastics

The presentation will outline a direction & structure for custom plastics molders to conceive new ideas, assess design viability, develop and ultimately market their own proprietary products to commercial or consumer markets.

No Magic Formula:
"The best-laid plans of mice and men often go awry"

Even the most carefully prepared plans may go wrong. Everybody believes that they have awesome ideas, have logical plans for optimal development, will have strong market penetration and certainly hope for multitudes of future revenues… but often those plans do not work out. Even though we carefully plan to the best of our ability and no matter how great an idea is, something may still go wrong with it.

Be realistic and sensible in your preliminary outlines, approach and expectations. Believe in your heart that you may have something that will revolutionize the world but settle for limited success in Springfield, MA if you can see a comfortable ROI.

Innovation can be very risky. Ford lost $350 million on its Edsel automobile; RCA lost $580 million on its SelectaVision videodisc player; and Texas Instruments lost a staggering $660 million before withdrawing from the home computer business. Other costly product failures from sophisticated companies include New Coke (Coca-Cola Company), Eagle Snacks (Anheuser- Busch), Zap Mail electronic mail (Federal Express), Polarvision instant movies (Polaroid), Premier "smokeless" cigarettes (R.J. Reynolds), Clorox detergent (Clorox Company), and Arch Deluxe sandwiches (McDonald's).

New products continue to fail at a disturbing rate. One source estimates that new consumer packaged goods fail at a rate of 80 percent. Another study suggested that of the staggering new consumer food, beverage, beauty, and health care products to hit the market each year, only 40 percent will be around five years later. Moreover, failure rates for new industrial products may be as high as 30 percent.

CONSIDERATIONS FOR YOUR MARKET DIVERSIFICATION STRATEGY

Ted Morgan, Plante Moran

  • Reasons to diversify (or at least to consider diversifying)
  • Key characteristics of companies who have successfully diversified
  • Framework for developing a strategy to diversify

Clarification point - focus of my discussion will be on a molding companies considering moving from its existing market(s) to one that it does not currently serve.

EFFECTIVELY COMPETING WITH CHINA BY DEVELOPING A NICHE MOLDING BUSINESS

Lynn Momrow-Zielinski, Extreme Molding

Competing with China and other low cost overseas molding companies remains a constant challenge for domestic molders. A key to business survival and success is differentiating your business from traditional commodity plastics injection molding. Examples of niche opportunities are silicone molding, two shot, insert over molding, TPE, and micro molding. These and other market opportunities will be discussed as well as the importance of developing a strategic business plan and focusing your business around that plan.

HIRING: OUTSMARTING THE CIRCUMSTANCES

Kevin Dailey, Director of Human Resources, Mack Molding Co.

As manufacturing has waned in the United States, so has the number of people going into the field. The U.S. labor force has shied away from learning skilled trades, and there is a well-publicized shortage of engineers, mathematicians and scientists. On top of that, the static housing market prevents many qualified applicants from relocating, as they're handcuffed to homes that won't sell. On a macroeconomic level, these are just some of the circumstances feeding today's hiring challenges.

The extent to which these issues filter down to a micro level in local communities depends on location. In New England, where Mack is headquartered, the manufacturing sector has been hit hard. Additionally, the company is in a rural area where there is not a vibrant manufacturing base to pull from. For non-New Englanders, the demographics can also be challenging, including the high costs of living and housing, as well as harsh winter weather conditions. Consequently, Mack has had to outsmart the circumstances and get creative in its hiring practices, including establishing both a college internship program and a robust employee training module, as well as fine-tuning its list of recruiters. If you've grown up in the area, you know what Vermont has to offer. But you may not know what Mack, as a potential employer, has to offer. With the intern program, we try to expose Vermont's brightest to careers right here at home that are fun, exciting and part of a growing industry. Hear more about how the program is constructed and our success rates to date.

Like most other companies, Mack also actively recruits at colleges and technical schools, and uses advertising, the Internet and recruiters to find talent. But unlike many companies, Mack uses niche recruiters, like those who specialize in placing individuals just coming out of military service. Not only do veterans possess great technical skills, but they are also disciplined, ambitious, and good problem solvers. The icing on the cake is that relocation costs are typically covered, and some have continuing benefits.

Finally, after working so hard to attract just the right people, you have to retain them. Mack has developed a robust training program that tracks each individual's level of job preparedness, as well as professional development programs. And when a new hire comes on board, a training matrix specific to that position is developed, which can include visits to other Mack facilities, off-site development programs, orientation sessions with other functional areas and staff, as well as the assignment of a mentor.

MEDICAL DEVICE APPROVAL PROCESS

Linda Braddon, Secure Biomed Evaluation

The approval process for a medical device changes depending on where the product will be commercially distributed. Each approval process has a different level of burden for gaining the clearances necessary to enter into commercial distribution for a particular country. The most common types of clearances include Premarket Notification also known as the 510(k) process in the United States and CE Marking for European distribution.

In the United States, FDA must determine that a device is both safe and effective in order to gain clearance. This can be done by showing substantial equivalence to a currently marketed device in a classic 510(k) application or by showing the device is safe, effective and of sufficiently low risk to gain clearance through a De Novo process. For high risk devices, the burden is significantly higher and permission to commercially distribute a high risk device is obtained through a PMA (Premarket approval) process. For European sales, CE marking is necessary to commercially distribute a product and the burden for a medical device company is safety.

Regardless of where a medical device company is trying to sell a product, there are critical pieces that need to be in place for success. Medical device companies are looking for manufacturing partners that understand the burden of a quality system (whether ISO 13485 or 21 CFR 820) and can produce consistent products at a competitive price. Changes in technology and manufacturing capabilities both open new doors for better product and increase the regulatory burden to show the manufacturing change does not create a new risk. Contract manufacturing companies can increase their added value to a medical device company by understanding both the quality and regulatory burden necessary to manufacture and commercially distribute a medical device.

INJECTION MOLD VALIDATION OF THERMOPLASTICS AND LIQUID SILICONE IN A MEDICAL INDUSTRY-A PROJECT PLAN APPROACH

Anand Agrawal, Supervisor Process Engineering, Carefusion

Several aspects of process validations for thermoplastic and liquid silicone injection molds as a good manufacturing practice,will be discussed in this paper. Importance of design review at various stages, steel verification during mold build, 1stshots, First Article Inspection (FAIR) followed by conducting a robust IQ/OQ/PQ will ensure capable tools and robust processes and will ensure that the tools run in production environment for a longer time.

Validation gives credibility to all phases of the tool build and production process and ensures that it performs per the intended use. Development of protocols, identifying the right labs, setting the key goals and expectations before a project starts and establishing the quality requirements ahead of time will be the focus of this presentation. Things that could be avoided before the company invests a lot of money into validating a mold will be discussed in this presentation.

The intricate differences between the different types of molding processes (thermoplastic or thermoset) and approaches to validating a mold while still meeting the tight Quality requirements will be the key discussion point for the presentation.

Although it will cost you added time and money, taking this extra step to thoroughly try the molds to successfully complete the process will save money in the long run.

THE MINIATURIZATION OF MOLDED MEDICAL DEVICES

Phil Kinson, Medical Business Manager, Husky

The medical industry represents some of the most challenging injection molding applications. These applications continually push the envelope in terms of product development and overall molding solutions. Many of these advancements are also subsequently applied in other markets where they can also provide value. One such requirement has been the need to precisely injection mold ever decreasing part weights without using cold runner. This requirement has been driven by the miniaturization of medical devices in combination with resin developments which have opened up the boundaries for plastic to be used in a growing number of healthcare applications, combined with increasing global volumes.

This presentation will show examples of where Husky has been able to demonstrate its complete system approach to eliminating variability in the complete injection molding process specifically for direct gating of extremely small parts. In so doing pushing the boundaries of injection molding into what are traditional considered 'micro molding' applications.

QUICKLY TURNING ENGINEERING CONCEPTS INTO HIGH QUALITY MEDICAL ASSEMBLIES AND PRODUCTS

Terrance M. Gleason, Business Development Executive for Medical Device, Spectrum Plastics Group

A presentation of the Spectrum Plastics Group (SPG) business model created four years ago by combining two Rapid Prototype/Rapid Tooling companies with two Production Molding/Assembly companies. SPG offers complete service beginning with Engineering/Design Guidance to Rapid Prototyping, Rapid tooling, Short Run Prototype and High Volume Molding, Validation, Assembly, Decoration and Packaging. This paper will present our business model and several case histories of successful projects.

NEW ADVANCEMENTS IN APPLYING HOT RUNNER TECHNOLOGIES EFFECTIVELY TO CHALLENGING MEDICAL MOLDING APPLICATIONS

Paul Boettger, Technoject Machinery Corp

The production of small size engineered plastic parts for the medical industry requires quality and process reliability as well as high output rates. This calls for hot runner technologies with individually controlled nozzles for close cavity spacing, systems with direct edge gating and clean room suitable actuations for valve gate systems.

Miniaturization of hot runner nozzles is opening up new ways to cost effectively ramp up to higher cavitation without increasing mold sizes and cavity spacings, which is a critical factor for thermally sensitive resins. Thermal management along the flow path of the hot runner system is vital to successfully process challenging resins with article weights in the less than 1 gram region.

Many small articles in the medical molding field require edge gate type designs due to lack of suitable top gate locations. New advancements in edge gate nozzle designs address the difficulties in placing a direct gate on the side. Separate thermal control of main feed tube and edge gate unit opens up new possibilities in molding resins with narrow processing windows.

Along with miniaturization of Valve Gate systems comes the need for suitable small size actuations especially in clean room environments. While separate drive units are no longer possible with close cavity spacing systems a new breed of actuations is emerging, such as Cam Bars and Plate Activators. While pneumatic actuation is commonplace in cleanrooms new linear servo electric motor systems can help to maximize precision and allow variable open and close speeds.

The challenges of molding small size medical parts with hot runner systems are overcome with new nozzle designs as well as thermal management and new activation methods. These developments are very valuable for any medical molder looking to utilize hot runner technologies in new and more productive ways.

POLYMER-BASED MICROFLUIDICS CHIPS: THE ENGINE THAT DRIVES A NEW CLASS OF MEDICAL DEVICES - PROGNOSTIC DEVICES

Rey Parel, Managing Director, Parel Engineering LLC

The impact of the microfluidics chip in the Life Sciences is similar in magnitude to the impact of the microchip in the Information Sciences. If the microchip reduced building-size computers to the size of a laptop, the microfluidics chip is reducing building-size laboratories and hospitals to the size of your thumb.

As Healthcare moves away from curing diseases by drugs and surgery toward preventing diseases via handheld POC (point-of-care) devices, the advent of the polymer-based microfluidics chip is the enabling technology that is making this happen. These new devices are called Prognostic Devices, as opposed to Diagnostic Devices.

Imagine a microfluidics-based POC Device that can detect BNP, the antigen that is produced by the heart in very minute quantities before the advent of Arrhythmia in a patient. Then the doctor can prevent the disease by changing the patient's life style, diet and exercise. There is such a device in pre-production right now, being funded by the Chinese government, because there are 100 million people with incipient arrhythmia-risk in the Chinese mainland, many without direct access to government hospitals.

Why polymer-based microfluidics chips? Because silicon-glass manufacturing processes are "demand elastic". This means that as the volumes increase toward the millions, the price/part becomes prohibitive. Over the last 25 years, microfluidics has been largely silicon-glass based, due to the their micron-size features, which was difficult to replicate using conventional molding methods and materials.

The state of the art, as far as tooling, polymers and processing, has finally caught up with the exacting demands of the microfluidics chip field. These are exciting breakthroughs in the following technologies that are enabling microfluidics chip molding:

  1. Microstructure and microfluidic tooling (conformal tooling, injection compression tooling, etc.)
  2. Microchannel molding and replication (rapid thermal processing, isothermal molding, induction heating molding, etc.)
  3. Surface modification (in-line cold vacuum plasma treatment, advanced hydrophilic spray methods, polymer cellular microdeposition methods, etc.)
  4. Highly advanced polymers processing (stimuli-response surface-mobile polymers, nanotechnology polymer processing, etc.)

I will also touch on tip-of-the-spear developments in equipment and machinery that have advanced in lock-step with the growth of the microfluidics chip field:

  1. microlaser welding and encapsulation technologies
  2. microwafer and micromponent fab
  3. microfluidics automation and assembly
  4. injection-compression molding machinery, software and auxiliary equipment
  5. microfluidics and conformal cooling/heating toolmakers
  6. manufacturers of surface stimuli-responsive supramolecular polymers

Session 5: Emerging Technologies

2:30pm

NEW METHOD FOR CHARACTERIZING THE INJECTION MOLDABILITY OF PLASTIC MATERIALS AND MOLD FILLING ANALYSIS VERIFICATION John Beaumont, President, Beaumont Technology
3:00pm DYNAMIC UNI-LAYER MELTING MODEL - A REVOLUTIONARY ADVANCEMENT IN PLASTICS PROCESSING TECHNOLOGY Trevor Spika, Spiral Logic Ltd.
3:30pm INNOVATION IN PROCESS SIMULATION: THE IMPACT OF USING COMPREHENSIVE SIMULATION John Berg, Director of Marketing, MGS Mfg. Group and Matt Proske, Vice President, SIGMA Plastic Services
4:00pm Coffee Break
4:30pm ACHIEVING OPTIMAL APPEARANCE ON TEXTURED PARTS Spanoudis Steve, Motorola Solutions
5:00pm IN-MOLD POLYMERIZATION - FROM MONOMER TO FINISHED PART IN ONE STEP Joachim Kragl, Engel
05:30pm HOW TO SALVAGE DAMAGED MOLDS Ed Jamison, Tooling Manager, Home Design Products, Inc.


Wednesday, January 23, 2013

8:00am Continental Breakfast


8:30am

NEW TECHNOLOGY MINIMIZES OR ELIMINATES BLEMISHES AND WELD LINES IN SEQUENTIAL MOLDING Mr. Stephen Byrnes, Hot Runner Systems Business Manager, Incoe
9:00am OVER MOLDING OF CONTINUOUS FIBER REINFORCED THERMOPLASTIC INSERTS FOR STRONG LIGHTWEIGHT STRUCTURES Kipp Grumm, BASF
9:30am FIBERFORM - THE COMBINATION OF INJECTION MOLDING AND THERMOFORMING OF ORGANIC SHEET Jochen Mitzler, Krauss Maffe
10:00am NEW MOLDING TECHNOLOGY WITH UV CURING OF LIQUID SILICONE RUBBER FOR LOW TEMPERATURE PROCESSING Clemens Trumm, Manager Application Development Center, Momentive Performance Materials GmbH, Germany
10:30am Coffee Break
11:00am ADVANCES IN POWDER INJECTION MOLDING Neal Goldenberg, Polymertek
11:30am METAL TO PLASTIC CONVERSION FOR AUTOMOTIVE HEATING AND COOLING SYSTEM Kirit C. Desai, Solvay Specialty Poymers
12:00pm INTERACTIONS BETWEEN POLYMER AND TOOLING INTERFACE WHEN INJECTION MOLDING MICROSTRUCTURED SURFACES Dan Dempsey, Alyssa Santiago Constantino, Jin-Goo Park, Michael McGee
12:30pm Conference Adjournment

NEW METHOD FOR CHARACTERIZING THE INJECTION MOLDABILITY OF PLASTIC MATERIALS AND MOLD FILLING ANALYSIS VERIFICATION

John Beaumont, President, Beaumont Technology

A new method for characterizing and mapping the injection moldability of plastic materials has been developed which is focused on providing practical and meaningful information to the plastics industry. Unlike today's standard extrusion based MFR tests and capillary rheometers, the new method evaluates the impact of mold temperature, injection rate and mold geometry on material flow though injection molds. Up to 140 different variations in process and geometry are used to map a material's injection moldability and then compiled into a simple format that can be used in product development, tool design, material selection, processing, new polymer development and injection molding simulation verifications.

DYNAMIC UNI-LAYER MELTING MODEL - A REVOLUTIONARY ADVANCEMENT IN PLASTICS PROCESSING TECHNOLOGY

Trevor Spika, Spiral Logic Ltd.

Spiral Logic's Dynamic Uni-Layer Melting Model represents a revolutionary advancement in plastics processing technology. Traditional screw design theory is founded on 1950's research and involves the formation of a solid-bed of resin between the screw flights. Melting of the solid bed is primarily accomplished by shear heating. By controlling melting at the pellet level, Spiral Logic's process advancements eliminate the solid-bed formation and the need for excessive, un-controlled shear heating. Significant benefits resulting from this new system include:

  1. Reduction of screw L/D to 13:1 by elimination of the compression zone
  2. Improved melting efficiency
  3. Improved material flow and reduced residence time and degradation
  4. Reduced machine energy consumption
  5. Elimination of carbon deposits in the screw/barrel and the associated "black spots" in products
  6. Increased process stability
  7. Elimination of random short shots
  8. Reduction in screw/barrel wear

The Spiral Logic Model is applicable to an extensive range of plastics and has been successfully implemented in both injection molding and extrusion applications.

The presentation will cover the methods and tools used to realize/demonstrate the limitations of traditional screw design, and explain how the Spiral Logic Model avoids these limitations to achieve a wide range of quantifiable plastics processing improvements.

INNOVATION IN PROCESS SIMULATION: THE IMPACT OF USING COMPREHENSIVE SIMULATION

John Berg, Director of Marketing, MGS Mfg. Group and Matt Proske, Vice President, SIGMA Plastic Services

This presentation will explain why the effective use of advanced simulation technologies will positively impact the profitability of an injection molding operation.

ACHIEVING OPTIMAL APPEARANCE ON TEXTURED PARTS

Spanoudis Steve, Motorola Solutions

Appearance defects can often be a major source of yield loss when molding parts with cosmetic customer requirements. Problems with surface textures in particular can delay start-up, lead to time-consuming mold repairs, and create unacceptable mismatches between parts from different molds or mold cavities. This paper surveys four different technologies for creating random and geometrically patterned surface textures, and evaluates their effectiveness at transferring these textures into the molded parts. Methods covered include acid etch texturing, automated EDM texturing, CNC laser etching, and .STL-driven CNC machining. Physical, statistical, and micrographic data will be presented and compared.

IN-MOLD POLYMERIZATION - FROM MONOMER TO FINISHED PART IN ONE STEP

Joachim Kragl, Engel

The process introduced is the in situ polymerization of monomers in an injection mold processed in a close to conventional injection molding machine. The composite fiber reinforcement is placed into the mold and then "overmolded" with the monomers to create a composite structure in a single production step. The low viscosity of the monomers allows for unprecedented design and process opportunities with this technology. The process allows the high volume production of composite parts in a very cost effective way with a faster cycle time than with other composite manufacturing methods.

HOW TO SALVAGE DAMAGED MOLDS

Ed Jamison, Tooling Manager, Home Design Products, Inc.

This paper discusses the unusual steps undertaken to salvage a catastrophically cracked plastic injection mold. The mold produces a 26" Cabinet Shelf in high volume using coining combined with expansion molding technology. Permanent loss of service of this injection mold presented an exigent risk of losing our 26" Cabinet business from our best customer. Building a replacement tool could not be done in time to save the business. Same situation with aluminum bridge tooling. Using conventional engineering principles for design of structural beam elements and out-of-the-box thinking, we were able to salvage the mold and place it back into production in 12 days. We are back to shipping our 26" Cabinet product and have ordered a replacement mold with the necessary design improvements.

NEW TECHNOLOGY MINIMIZES OR ELIMINATES BLEMISHES AND WELD LINES IN SEQUENTIAL MOLDING

Mr. Stephen Byrnes, Hot Runner Systems Business Manager, Incoe

The technique of using hot runner valve-gates to sequentially deliver the melt to the cavity is a standard industry practice. Sequential valve-gating reduces the otherwise flow front collisions between a set of nozzles and moves the "knit line" to the end of the part or to a more suitable location on the part. However, there still exist applications using proper sequential molding practices where "unexplained" flow marks occur on the part. This flow mark can occur between a set of nozzles and/or near the gate itself that the molder is unable to reduce.

The material flow hesitation mark can be created by the very sudden drop of pressure as the melt is introduced into the cavity at an initial high rate of velocity as the sequence of valve-gated nozzles actuate. The material "blasts" into the cavity and, in essence, backfilling and jetting within the part with the quick opening of the next valve-gate pin.

Solution
Incoe Corporation® has developed new technology that allows the processor to precisely control the valve-gate pin opening time from the full closed position to the open position. This new technology enables gradual and controlled flow of plastic into the cavity at each gate. The reduced pressure peaks during the valve-gate opening result in reducing or eliminating the negative effects of blemishes and weld lines associated with traditional sequential injection molding. Clearly the current market environment requires that surface aesthetics of sequentially valve-gated parts be of the highest quality and this new technology delivers. The attendees of Molding 2013 will find a presentation on this new technology to be timely, innovative, informative, and most importantly a solution.

OVER MOLDING OF CONTINUOUS FIBER REINFORCED THERMOPLASTIC INSERTS FOR STRONG LIGHTWEIGHT STRUCTURES

Kipp Grumm, BASF

The over-molding of continuous fiber reinforced thermoplastic inserts is a technology that produces strong, lightweight components. This technology extends the capability of short and long glass fiber reinforced materials by using continuous glass fiber inserts to address structural loads while the short glass fiber resins allow for structural support, feature integration, component integration and aesthetics. This paper describes the engineering properties and advantages of using continuous fiber reinforced thermoplastic inserts and the manufacturing steps involved. In addition, technical issues of adhesion and CAE modeling and correlation will be discussed. A case study of an automotive seat back will presented as successful example of this technology.

FIBERFORM - THE COMBINATION OF INJECTION MOLDING AND THERMOFORMING OF ORGANIC SHEET

Jochen Mitzler, krauss Maffei

Production benefits

  • Short cycle times
  • High degree of automation
  • Repeatable, process reliable technology
  • Production of:
    • Complex, - Three-dimensional geometries (design freedom)
    • - Without any post-processing (flash-free parts
  • Integration of additional functions (antennas, sensors, inserts,) within the same process step
  • Simulation of parts
  • Wide process window of one step process
  • Process suitable for series production of structural parts
  • Availability of material characteristics
  • Parts without rework
  • Weight savings compared to steel/aluminum > 20%

NEW MOLDING TECHNOLOGY WITH UV CURING OF LIQUID SILICONE RUBBER FOR LOW TEMPERATURE PROCESSING

Clemens Trumm, Manager Application Development Center, Momentive Performance Materials GmbH, Germany

Novel Silicone Rubber curing Technology with UV Light

  • low temperature curing for new material combinations
  • energy saving through cure on command
  • new process technology with transparent mold inserts

ADVANCES IN POWDER INJECTION MOLDING

Neal Goldenberg, Polymertek

Powder Injection Molding (including metal injection molding (MIM) and ceramic injection molding (CIM)) is a growing technology having widespread applications in many varied industries and markets. The technology allows for the manufacture of complex, tightly-toleranced metal or ceramic components to be produced in very high volume. This is achieved for a fraction of the cost of machined or investment cast parts.

Since PIM's emergence as a viable, commercial manufacturing technology in the mid-to-late '90s, many plastics injection molding companies pursued this technology and made the significant capital equipment investments. Early adopters were typically molders that specialized in the processing of engineered resins and/or high temperature materials. Many companies tried (and failed) to make that difficult transition into this new materials and processing arena; consequently failures, divestitures and bankruptcies were common. Since then, of the MIM companies which began during that era and are still doing MIM, most have been sold or changed hands at least once, some many times over.

Our family owned-and-operated company (Polymer Technologies Inc), is a plastics injection molding company founded in 1987 and has actively involved in PIM since 1997. Today, we still operate under the same, original ownership as when we started. There are many variables to the success (or failure) of a molding company making the switch to PIM. One key element, we have found, is to have a solid appreciation for the real capabilities (and limitations) of the technology in addition to a solid grasp of the true costs. Understanding this, in-turn, will allow you to effectively manage your customer's expectations and grow your business. This presentation will highlight many of the critical elements which were essential to our PIM company's successful transition to PIM and our continued growth and success utilizing the technology.

METAL TO PLASTIC CONVERSION FOR AUTOMOTIVE HEATING AND COOLING SYSTEM

Kirit C. Desai, Solvay Specialty Poymers

In response to tougher CAFE regulations and stricter emissions standards, OEMs are identifying new ways to reduce the cost and weight of engine cooling components. Over the years, thermoplastics have replaced metal for thermostat housings and water inlets/outlets and more recently they are becoming preferred material for water cooled charged air cooling (WCCAC), EGR, DCTs and battery-pack cooling. Most of the cooling parts are connected with rubber hoses. In metal, the bead area has a smooth machined surface for easy installation. But, in case of plastic, the bead area requires parting line for proper part ejection. The parting line could be very sharp and could create a cut during installation, resulting in a coolant leak path. To avoid such a quality issue, OEMs specify no parting line in the barbed area. One of the key differentiating factors for Amodel PPA in engine cooling parts is that the molded parts do not require a parting line in the barb area. This unique feature allows OEMs to design the complex parts with higher number of outlets which is almost impossible with standard molding technology using parting line ejection. It also allows integrating two parts in one to optimize total cost of production, assembly and hardware for installation.

The presentation also explains the usage of computer aided engineering (CAE), scientific molding and in-mold sensors to reduce cost by part integration.

INTERACTIONS BETWEEN POLYMER AND TOOLING INTERFACE WHEN INJECTION MOLDING MICROSTRUCTURED SURFACES

Daniel P. Dempsey1, Alyssa Santiago Constantino1, Jin-Goo Park2, Michael McGee3, Joey L. Mead1, Carol M. F. Barry1

1Ph.D. Student, UMass Lowell
2Hanyang University, Ansan, South Korea
3Nypro Incorporated, Clinton, MA

Injection molding of parts with micro and nanostructured surfaces has grown due to the advent of tooling inserts which are robust enough to withstand the rigors of the manufacturing process. With a larger range of tooling substrate materials to choose from, it becomes paramount to understand how their respective physical properties (thermal conductivity, surface energy, surface roughness, etc.) can affect microfeature molding as interactions increase with decreasing feature size. The goal of this research was to establish a work progression which can separate and study the extent of the effects of each factor in order to obtain a fully compatible tooling/polymer system. This was done by examining two tooling substrates, nickel cobalt and stainless steel, and their impact on the replication of a series of micropillars with multiple polymer materials.